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Tax Tips & Traps – 2017 1st Quarter


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First Quarter


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Tax Tips and Traps - 2014 3rd Quarer




Federal Budget 2014


Costs incurred for child care expenses are among the most frequent deductions claimed by Canadian taxpayers on their annual tax returns. And, for many Canadian families, especially those with more than one child, or those who live in large urban centres, the cost of child care can consume a significant percentage of their annual budget.


It’s not news that the Canadian tax system is complex and that most Canadians, especially those who only encounter it once a year at tax-filing time, would rather not have to deal with that complexity. Consequently, over the next couple of months, it’s likely that more than 16 million Canadian taxpayers will seek out the services of professional tax return preparers and tax discounters, in order to get their 2016 returns completed and EFILED on time.


The time is fast approaching when the annual chore of gathering together the various pieces of information needed to complete one’s annual tax return, and getting that return completed and filed can’t be delayed any longer. For those wishing to put that chore off as long as possible, there is one (very small) bit of good news. Individual Canadians (other than the self-employed and their spouses) are required to file the annual return by April 30 of the following year, and to pay any tax amount owed by the same deadline. This year, since April 30 falls on a Sunday, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has extended that filing and payment deadline to the following day, Monday May 1, 2017. Self-employed taxpayers have until Thursday June 15, 2017 to file their returns for 2016, but they too must pay any outstanding tax amounts owed for that year by Monday May 1, 2017.


Although individual Canadians file the same T1 Income Tax Return form each year, the rules governing the information to be provided on that return form and the tax consequences flowing from that information is in a constant state of change. And, it’s a safe bet that very few taxpayers read the annual Income Tax Guide carefully to find out what’s changed on this year’s return.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.